Science

Unlike Earth, Maybe Mars Didn’t Form With a Subsurface Magma Ocean

Researchers thought Mars formed — and potentially created a life-supporting atmosphere — like Earth did.
Topics: Mars, Space

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Cooped Up at Home? Help Scientists Spot Penguins from Space or Seek Out Galaxies

Some citizen science projects can be done during quarantine -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Topics: Space, Galaxies

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Production of NASA's new X-59 supersonic jet continues amid coronavirus outbreak

Work continues on NASA's new supersonic X-plane, the X-59 test vehicle, despite closures and delays in the space industry caused by the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.
Topics: NASA, Space

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Chances for Coronavirus to Get to ISS 'Slim to None' - NASA Specialist

WASHINGTON (Sputnik) - Chances for the novel coronavirus to get into the International Space Station (ISS) are next to zero due to the enhanced security measures undertaken by the space agencies, NASA nurse Raksana Batsmanova says.
Topics: International Space Station, NASA, Space

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Building Moon Bases Using Urine

This is an interesting idea that will probably not be actually implemented (although not impossible) but does raise some important points. A paper explores the viability of using urea from human urine as an agent in lunar concrete. Why is something...
Topics: Moon, Space

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Unique structural fluctuations at ice surface promote autoionization of water molecules

Water ice is one of the most abundant solid substances in nature and hydrated protons on ice surfaces critically influence physical and chemical properties of ice. Hydrated protons are easily doped into the hydrogen-bond (HB) networks when acidic...
Topics: Hydrogen

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Resolving spatial and energetic distributions of trap states in metal halide perovskite solar cells

In a new report published on Science, Zhenyi Ni and a research team in applied physical sciences, mechanical and materials engineering and computer and energy engineering in the U.S. profiled spatial and energetic distributions of trap states or...
Topics: Solar Power

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Tiny optical cavity could make quantum networks possible

Engineers at Caltech have shown that atoms in optical cavities—tiny boxes for light—could be foundational to the creation of a quantum internet. Their work was published on March 30 by the journal Nature.
Topics: Quantum, Physics

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How will clouds obscure the view of exoplanet surfaces?

In 2021, NASA's next-generation observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), will take to space. Once operational, this flagship mission will pick up where other space telescopes—like Hubble, Kepler and Spitzer—left off. This means that...
Topics: Exoplanets, NASA, Space, Telescopes, Hubble Space Telescope

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Humans were born to run. Exoskeletons might make us better at it.

New research from Stanford finds that motor-powered ankle exoskeletons conserve 15 percent of energy expenditure when running. Spring-powered exoskeletons without motors actually made running harder.The researchers hope to develop better...

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Gemini, the 'heavenly twins' grace the evening sky this spring

Visible above the southwest horizon in the early evenings, the constellation of Gemini, the twins is rich with celestial sights. Here's the story behind the "heavenly twins."
Topics: Constellations

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Rethinking What It Means To Be A Truly Global Species

Updating the Pioneer 10 and 11 plaques for 2020. #SETI #Astrobiology #COVID19 #Coronavirus pic.twitter.com/SzO1EmDdkS— NASA Watch (@NASAWatch) March 30, 2020
Topics: SETI, Twitter, Social Media, NASA, Space

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Astronomers have finally found the edge of the Milky Way galaxy

Astronomers have at last identified what's believed to be the edge of the Milky Way galaxy. A team of astronomers from England used that farthest point to determine that the diameter of the Milky Way is 1.9 million light-years, plus or minus 0.4...
Topics: Space, Milky Way

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Our living spaces are bigger than ever. But not for the reason you think

Tiny houses may be trendy in some communities, but worldwide, people are living with more space at home than any other time in history. And that’s not a good thing. Around the world, more people are living with more space at home than at any...

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Using chemical boundary engineering to create steel that is strong and flexible without high carbon...

A team of researchers from China, Germany, Japan and the Netherlands has found a way to use chemical boundary engineering to create steel that is strong and flexible without the need for high carbon content. In their paper published in the journal...

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Studying the mechanism for avian magnetic orientation

Ornithologists and physicists from St Petersburg University have conducted an interdisciplinary study together with colleagues from Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Biological...
Topics: Physics

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How were Supermassive Black Holes Already Forming and Releasing Powerful Jets Shortly After the Big...

A series of studies has shown that the seeds of supermassive black holes and relativistic jets existed much sooner than expected The post How were Supermassive Black Holes Already Forming and Releasing Powerful Jets Shortly After the Big Bang?...
Topics: Black Holes, Big Bang

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Bubbles go with the flow

Scientists have developed a new computer simulation model that includes microbubble nucleation to explain the flow slippage of fluids inside pipes. This work may help improve the flow rate of viscous fluids in commercial applications, as in the...

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Sturgeon genome sequenced

Sometimes referred to as the "the Methuselah of freshwater fish," sturgeons and their close relatives are very old from an evolutionary point of view. Fossils indicate that sturgeons date back 250 million years and have changed very little during...
Topics: Genetics, Fossils, Paleontology

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Research identifies regular climbing behavior in a human ancestor

A new study led by the University of Kent has found evidence that human ancestors as recent as two million years ago may have regularly climbed trees.

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