Archaeology

Gas Pipe Workers Find 800-year-old Bodies In Peru

Peruvian workers laying gas pipes found the remains of eight people buried in a common tomb with food and musical instruments some 800 years ago, an archaeologist said Wednesday.

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Those Earrings Are So Last Year – But The Reason You're Wearing Them Is Ancient

Shell beads found in a cave in Morocco are at least 142,000 years old. The archaeologists who found them say they're the earliest known evidence of a widespread form of human communication.

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Bronze Age City Destroyed By Bolide

Guest “They nailed this one” by David Middleton Scientific archaeology is essentially forensic history. It is an interdisciplinary effort, involving multiple disciplines, often including: archaeology, geology, geophysics, physical...
Related topics: Geology

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Rare Artefacts Discovered On The Murray River

New research by archaeologists has described rare shell artifacts discovered at Calperum Station and Murrawong (Glen Lossie) on the Murray River in South Australia.
Related topics: Scientific Discoveries

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Relics From The Early Days Of The Sinclair Software Scene Rediscovered At Museum During Lockdown...

Remember when a games developer could be one guy with a ZX Spectrum? We like a bit of digital archaeology at Vulture Central so we were delighted to learn that retro-computing enthusiasts at Swindon's Museum of Computing have found games by Dymond...
Related topics: Museum

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Milk Enabled Massive Steppe Migration

The long-distance migrations of early Bronze Age pastoralists in the Eurasian steppe have captured widespread interest. But the factors behind their remarkable spread have been heavily debated by archaeologists. Now a new study provides clues...

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Scientists Develop A Statistical Fix For Archaeology's Dating Problem

Archeologists have long had a dating problem. The radiocarbon analysis typically used to reconstruct past human demographic changes relies on a method easily skewed by radiocarbon calibration curves and measurement uncertainty. And there's never...

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How Do Archaeologists Crack The Code Of Dead Languages?

From the Rosetta stone to the Enigma Code, there are two main ways to decipher an extinct language, but artificial intelligence is helping to modify translations.

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9,000 Years Ago, Funerals In China Involved A Lot Of Beer

Enlarge (credit: Wang et al. 2021) At a 9,000-year-old burial site in China called Qiaotou, archaeologists recently unearthed a number of ceramic vessels. Some of the vessels were shaped like the long-necked, round-bellied bronze pots that people...
Related topics: China

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Research Delves Into Role Of Turkeys To Ancestral Pueblo Peoples

Research recently published by adjunct assistant professor Cyler Conrad from the Department of Archaeology at The University of New Mexico examines the importance of turkeys to the Ancestral Pueblo people and how they have managed the birds for more...

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Give Us A Clu: Object Oriented Programming Pioneer Arrives On Github

No, not the 1980s TV show where Lionel Blair attempted to mime data abstraction to Una Stubbs Retro fans, rejoice! A bit of digital archaeology has turned up a working early version of the CLU programming language and the files needed to create it...
Related topics: Github

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Pompeii Tomb Reveals Formerly Enslaved Man’s Rise To Wealth And Power

Enlarge (credit: Pompeii Archaeological Park) Archaeologists working in Pompeii recently unearthed the tomb and partially mummified remains of a man who died a few decades before the eruption. The man, Marcus Venerius Secundio, according to his...

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Researchers Excavate Parts Of Ancient Woman’s Skeleton That Reveals Shocking Facts

The fossil excavated by the archaeologists mainly came from the skull and pelvis. The researchers extracted the DNA from a dense bone in the base of the skull that’s known to preserve genetic material properly. Meanwhile, radiocarbon dating of a...
Related topics: Fossils, Paleontology, DNA, Genetics

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Ancient Woman's Dna Provides First Evidence For The Origin Of A Mysterious Lost Culture: The...

In 2015, archaeologists from the University of Hasanuddin in Makassar, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, uncovered the skeleton of a woman buried in a limestone cave. Studies revealed the person from Leang Panninge, or "Bat Cave," was 17 or 18...
Related topics: DNA, Genetics

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'absolutely Fantastic' Iron Age Grave Of Likely Roman Warrior Found On Swedish Island

According to archaeologists, warrior graves of this kind, dating back to the 300s-500s, may be found once every 30 years. This particular one, however, stands out due to its possible connections to continental Europe and the Roman Empire.

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Dispelling False Claims Of Cannibalistic Caribs—again

SFU archaeologist Christina Giovas and colleagues are formally denouncing what they call unsubstantiated and harmful claims of cannibalistic Caribs migrating to the Caribbean, in a paper published today in Nature's Scientific Reports.

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Archaeologists Figured Out Why Stonehenge's Sandstone Boulders Have Lasted For Millennia

The sun sets behind Stonehenge just after the winter solstice. Gail Johnson/Getty Images A new study offers insight into why Stonehenge has remained unchanged since it was built 5,000 years ago. Sarsens, the massive boulders that make up part of...
Related topics: Sun

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Archaeologists Reveal Origins Of Famous Stone Age Monument

Archaeologists from the Universities of Manchester and Cardiff have discovered the origins of Arthur's Stone, one of the UK's most famous Stone Age monuments.
Related topics: Scientific Discoveries

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A 2,000 Year-old Fast-food Joint Discovered By Archaeologists In Pompeii Will Reopen To The Public...

An ancient counter depicting a nymph riding a horse. Luigi Spina/Parco Archeologico di Pompei via AP A 2,000-year-old diner discovered by archaeologists in Pompeii will open to the public this summer. The "thermopolium" is the first of 80...
Related topics: Scientific Discoveries

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Evidence Of Biblical Earthquake Found In Jerusalem

TEL AVIV (Sputnik) - Israeli archaeologists detected ruins of an 8th century BCE earthquake described in the Bible during excavations in the City of David, Jerusalem earliest settlement, Israeli Antiquities Authority (IAA) said.
Related topics: Earthquakes, Israel, Jerusalem, Tel,aviv, Religion

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